Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Understanding the relationships between wellbeing, goal-setting and depression in children

Durkin, Kevin and Street, Helen and Nathan, Paula and Durkin, Evelyn and Morling, Jonathan and Dzahari, Mohamed Azahar and Carson, Joel (2004) Understanding the relationships between wellbeing, goal-setting and depression in children. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 38 (3). pp. 155-161. ISSN 1440-1614

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

This study investigates children's conceptions of happiness and wellbeing in relation to goal choice. It examines the prevalence and impact of Conditional goal setting (CGS) on levels of wellbeing and depression. Conditional goal setting describes commitment toward an important goal resulting from a conception that happiness is an end-point achieved through the attainment of this goal. Conditional goal setting has been identified as a significant factor in the development and maintenance of depression in adults. This study examines these same concepts among children.