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Interacting Influences on Interrogative Suggestibility

Baxter, Jim and Bain, Stella and Fellowes, Vivienne (2004) Interacting Influences on Interrogative Suggestibility. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 9 (2). pp. 239-252. ISSN 1355-3259

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Abstract

Research using the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scales (GSS) has found interrogative suggestibility (IS) to vary as a function of the overall demeanour of the interviewer, warnings about the presence of misleading information, and the self-esteem of the interviewee, as outlined by Gudjonsson and Clark (1986). The present study attempted to assess how these factors interact. The results supported studies showing that all three variables tested affect levels of IS but further suggested that optimal interviewer support for interviewees' discrepancy detection may be provided either by a relaxed interviewer manner or by warnings alone, but not by both.