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Development of adaptive algorithms for the operation of windows, fans, and doors to predict thermal comfort and energy use in Pakistani buildings

Rijal, Hom B. and Tuohy, Paul and Humphreys, Michael A. and Nicol, J. Fergus and Samuel, Aizaz and Raja, Iftikhar A. and Clarke, Joe (2008) Development of adaptive algorithms for the operation of windows, fans, and doors to predict thermal comfort and energy use in Pakistani buildings. American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Transactions, 114 (2). pp. 555-573. ISSN 0001-2505

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Abstract

This year-round field investigation of the use of building controls (windows, doors and fans) in 33 Pakistani offices and commercial buildings focuses on 1) how the occupants' behavior is related to thermal comfort, 2) how people modify the indoor environment and 3) how we can predict the occupants' behavior. We have found that the use of building controls depends on climate and season. The use of these controls has a cooling effect on the occupant through increasing the air movement or the ventilation. The behavioral model yields adaptive algorithms that can be applied in building thermal simulations to predict the effects of the occupants' behavior on energy-saving building design.