Picture water droplets

Developing mathematical theories of the physical world: Open Access research on fluid dynamics from Strathclyde

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Mathematics & Statistics, where continuum mechanics and industrial mathematics is a specialism. Such research seeks to understand fluid dynamics, among many other related areas such as liquid crystals and droplet evaporation.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics also demonstrates expertise in population modelling & epidemiology, stochastic analysis, applied analysis and scientific computing. Access world leading mathematical and statistical Open Access research!

Explore all Strathclyde Open Access research...

Enhancing the performance of piezoelectric ultrasound transducers by the use of multiple matching layers

Mulholland, A. and Ramadas, S.N. and O'Leary, R.L. and Parr, A.C.S. and Hayward, G. and Troge, Alexandre and Pethrick, R.A. (2008) Enhancing the performance of piezoelectric ultrasound transducers by the use of multiple matching layers. IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics, 73 (6). pp. 936-949. ISSN 1464-3634

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

A linear system model is developed for a composite piezoelectric transducer with multiple matching layers. The large number of degrees of freedom in this model and the sensitivity of the device performance to these parameters make the inverse problem, of choosing these parameters to optimize the device's performance, an extremely difficult task. However, by accepting a small number of assumptions on the nature of the propagating waves in the device a Chebyshev polynomial approach is used to reduce the degrees of freedom and arrive at an algorithm for a device design. A typical device is investigated using this approach and it is shown that a threefold improvement in the device performance can be achieved over the standard single-matching-layer design. The modelling also indicated that great care has to be taken in bonding the matching layers together to ensure the homogeneity of the bonds. A transducer with four matching layers was subsequently manufactured and the experimental results show a significant improvement in the device performance, in agreement with the model predictions.