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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Promoting physical activity in a socially and economically deprived community: a 12 month randomized control trial of fitness assessment and exercise consultation

Lowther, M. and Mutrie, N. and Scott, E.M. (2002) Promoting physical activity in a socially and economically deprived community: a 12 month randomized control trial of fitness assessment and exercise consultation. Journal of Sports Sciences, 20 (7). pp. 577-588. ISSN 0264-0414

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Abstract

The main aim of this study was to assess the effects of a fitness assessment and exercise consultation on physical activity over 1 year in non-regularly active participants drawn from a socially and economically deprived community. Of 3000 people invited to volunteer for either intervention, 225 fitness assessment volunteers were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group; 145 exercise consultation volunteers were similarly assigned. Physical activity was measured at baseline, 4 weeks, 3 months (plus an intervention re-test), 6 months and 1 year. Analysis of variance and follow-up Bonferroni analysis showed that, for those not regularly active at baseline, physical activity increased significantly to 4 weeks, was maintained to 6 months but had fallen by 1 year. Only those receiving an exercise consultation significantly increased their physical activity after 1 year. Compared with fitness assessments, chi-square analysis showed that significantly more non-regularly active participants volunteered for an exercise consultation and those receiving an exercise consultation had significantly better long-term study adherence than those receiving a fitness assessment. The study also showed that, contrary to popular opinion, those in a socially and economically deprived community are not 'hard to reach' and respond well to physical activity interventions.