A review: Autodissemination of Pyriproxyfen as novel strategy to control dengue outbreaks

Mohd Ngeson, Ahmad Mohiddin and Greenhalgh, David and Md Lasim, Asmalia and Sahani, Mazrura and Hod, Rozita and Othman, Hidayatulfath (2020) A review: Autodissemination of Pyriproxyfen as novel strategy to control dengue outbreaks. Journal of Science & Technology. ISSN 2456-5660 (In Press)

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    Abstract

    The new emergence and re-emergence of arbovirus infections transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes have been spreading across Southeast Asia, Central Africa, United States, tropical Oceania and has become a major of public health concern. These arbovirus diseases were found to have a similar vector, symptoms and environments. The situation is complex due to no specific vaccine or treatments being available for the diseases. Therefore, vector control is currently the best defense against arbovirus diseases, but with its own challenges such as the difficulty in controlling scattered breeding sites and biological behavior. Herein, we present a literature review of studies on current techniques proposed to combat dengue transmission that can fill a crucial gap in vector control programs, which is the inability of conventional control methods to eliminate and destroy cryptic breeding sites. In particular, we focused on the concept of autodissemination, which is a self-delivery technique by manipulating the behavior of mosquitoes, carrying the insecticide and disseminating it to cryptic breeding sites. This technique has shown promising results in some countries and can be considered as an additional tool in a vector control program. Therefore, we conducted Boolean searches in several electronic databases including Google Scholar, PubMed, SciELO and ScienceDirect to identify relevant published data regarding dengue and autodissemination techniques.