Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Comparing the performance of baseball players : a multiple output approach

Koop, Gary (2002) Comparing the performance of baseball players : a multiple output approach. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 97 (459). pp. 710-720. ISSN 0162-1459

[img]
Preview
PDF (strathprints006945.pdf)
strathprints006945.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (516kB) | Preview

Abstract

This article extends ideas from the economics literature on multiple output production and efficiency to develop methods for comparing baseball players that take into account the many dimensions to batting performance. A key part of this approach is the output aggregator. The weights in this output aggregator can be selected a priori (as is done with batting or slugging averages) or can be estimated statistically based on the performance of the best players in baseball. Once the output aggregator is obtained, an individual player can then be measured relative to the best, and a number between 0 and 1 characterizes his performance as a fraction of the best. The methods are applied to hitters using data from 1995-1999 on all regular players in baseball's major leagues.