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Transformational teaching, self-presentation motives, and identity in adolescent female physical education

Verma, Nina and Eklund, Robert C. and Arthur, Calum A. and Howle, Timothy C. and Gibson, Ann-Marie (2019) Transformational teaching, self-presentation motives, and identity in adolescent female physical education. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 41 (1). pp. 1-9. ISSN 0895-2779

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    Abstract

    This study examined whether teachers’ use of transformational teaching behaviors, as perceived by adolescent girls, in physical education would predict girls’ moderate to vigorous physical activity via mediated effects of physical activity self-presentation motives, physical activity identity, and physical education class engagement. Self-report data were acquired from 273 Scottish high school girls in Grades S1–S3 (the equivalent of Grades 7–9 in North America) at 2 time points separated by 1 week. Significant predictive pathways were found from transformational teaching to girls’ moderate to vigorous physical activity via mediated effects of acquisitive self-presentation motives and physical activity identity. This preliminary study provides a novel contribution to the research area by showing how previously unrelated psychosocial constructs work together to predict adolescent girls’ moderate to vigorous physical activity. Results are discussed in relation to existing literature and future research directions.