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Functional design method for improving safety and ergonomics of mechanical products

Robert, Aurélie and Roth, Sébastien and Chamoret, Dominique and Yan, Xiutian and Peyraut, Francois and Gomes, Samuel (2012) Functional design method for improving safety and ergonomics of mechanical products. Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, 5. pp. 457-468. ISSN 1937-688X

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Abstract

In order to help companies to improve their competetiveness, it is important to develop new design methodologies. In this framework, a Functional And Robust Design (FARD) methodology dedicated to routine design of “highly productive” modular product ranges is proposed including principles of functional analysis, Design For Assembly (DFA), and techniques of modelling and simulation for ergonomics consideration. This paper focuses on the application of this original method applied to mechanical vibration and ergonomics problems of a scraper. Including biomechanical aspect in the design methodology, it is possible to identify the impact of a vibration tool on its users using numerical models of the tool coupled to a finite element model of the human hand. This method can proactively warn very early, in the design process, the risks of causing musculoskeletal disorders and facilitate an optimization of the mechanical tool. This study is a first step in a context of human-centered design.