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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

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SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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The System-wide Impact of Healthy Eating : Assessing Emissions and Economic Impacts at the Regional Level

Allan, Grant and Comerford, David and McGregor, Peter (2018) The System-wide Impact of Healthy Eating : Assessing Emissions and Economic Impacts at the Regional Level. Working paper. University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

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    Abstract

    Encouraging consumers to shift their diets towards to a lower meat/lower calorie alternative has been the focus of food and health policies across the world. The economic impact on regions has been less widely examined, but is likely to be significant, where agricultural and food activities are important for the host region. In this study we use a multi-sectoral modelling framework to examine the environmental and economic impacts of a dietary change, and illustrate this using a detailed model for Scotland. We find that if household food and drink consumption follows healthy eating guidelines, it would reduce both Scotland’s “footprint” and “territorial” emissions, and yet may be associated with positive economic impacts, generating a “double dividend” for both the environment and the economy. Furthermore, the likely benefits to health suggest the potential for a “triple dividend”. The economic impact however depends critically upon how households use the income previously spent on higher calorie diets.