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Urban traditions in the midst of the Chinatown of Liverpool and the quasi-enclave of Glasgow

Salama, Ashraf M. and Remali, Adel M. (2018) Urban traditions in the midst of the Chinatown of Liverpool and the quasi-enclave of Glasgow. Traditional Dwellings and Settlements - Working Paper Series, 292. ISSN 1050-2092

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Abstract

Migration has contributed to shaping urban transformation in cities at various scales. Today, it is emerging as a polarising challenge within the politics of urbanism. This article considers the draw of British cities on Chinese migrants, perceived as cities of opportunity, security, and the seeking of upward mobility in a new place to call home. The study questions whether staging an ethnic community and its subsequent origin or source traditions is beneficial to cultural diversity in the city, or whether this may lead to a lack of integration and opportunity for the migrant communities. In a comparative assessment, the dense Chinatown of Liverpool is juxtaposed with the dispersed ethnic enclaves of Chinese migrants across Glasgow, revealing their authenticity, community cohesiveness, and identity within their urban milieus.