Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Chemical etching as a method of combatting adhesive tool wear during severe plastic deformation of commercially-pure titanium

Roszak, J.A. and Rosochowski, A. and Rosochowska, M. (2017) Chemical etching as a method of combatting adhesive tool wear during severe plastic deformation of commercially-pure titanium. In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering. IOS Press, Amsterdam, pp. 15-20. ISBN 978-1-61499-791-7

[img]
Preview
Text (Roszak-etal-ICMR-2017-Chemical-etching-as-a-method-of-combatting-adhesive-tool)
Roszak_etal_ICMR_2017_Chemical_etching_as_a_method_of_combatting_adhesive_tool.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (418kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper investigates chemical etching as a potential temporary solution to severe adhesive wear experienced during forming of commercially-pure titanium. The aim was to identify contributing factors and experimentally quantify their effects on the etching of CP-Ti and Vanadis 23 tool steel. A comprehensive literature review identified a promising etchant solution, containing 6.5% hydrofluoric acid, 2% formic acid and 2% triethanolamine. A full factorial experiment was designed to test the effects of three factors – hydrofluoric acid concentration, temperature, and time – with statistical analysis to interpret and validate the results. The results confirmed that increasing any of the factors tested leads to a significant increase in titanium dissolution, while only temperature and concentration increases led to a significant increase in steel dissolution. Therefore, a 20°C solution of 3.5% hydrofluoric acid and an etching duration of 35 minutes is recommended for removing adhered titanium without significantly affecting the steel.