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Multiplex imaging of live breast cancer tumour models through tissue using handheld surface enhanced spatially offset resonance Raman spectroscopy (SESORRS)

Nicolson, Fay and Jamieson, Lauren E. and Mabbott, Samuel and Plakas, Konstantinos and Shand, Neil C. and Detty, Michael R. and Graham, Duncan and Faulds, Karen (2018) Multiplex imaging of live breast cancer tumour models through tissue using handheld surface enhanced spatially offset resonance Raman spectroscopy (SESORRS). Chemical Communications, 54 (61). pp. 8530-8533. ISSN 1359-7345

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Abstract

Through utilizing the depth penetration capabilities of SESORS, multiplexed imaging and classification of three singleplex nanotags and a triplex of nanotags within breast cancer tumour models is reported for the first time through depths of 10 mm using a handheld SORS instrument.