Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

A simulation-based evaluation of the benefits and barriers to interconnected solar home systems in East Africa

Soltowski, Bartosz and Bowes, Jonathan and Strachan, Scott and Anaya-Lara, Olimpo (2018) A simulation-based evaluation of the benefits and barriers to interconnected solar home systems in East Africa. In: IEEE PES Power Africa Conference 2018, 2018-06-26 - 2018-06-29. (In Press)

[img]
Preview
Text (Soltowski-etal-2018-A-simulation-based-evaluation-of-the-benefits-and-barriers)
Soltowski_etal_2018_A_simulation_based_evaluation_of_the_benefits_and_barriers.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (803kB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper outlines the relative advantages and disadvantages of interconnecting Solar Home Systems (SHSs) to form micro-grids. Real world remote monitoring data from a number of SHSs operated by BBOXX in Rwanda is analyzed and it is shown that significant demand diversity and differing patterns of energy use exist in SHSs. Significant variation in daily demand, is demonstrated for identical SHSs from 0-10 Wh/day up to 110 Wh/day. Around 65% of generated energy is currently unused and could be utilised to connect new customers and increase the demand of existing customers if systems were interconnected.