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Comparative review of collision avoidance systems in maritime and aviation

Abdushkour, Hesham and Turan, Osman and Boulougouris, Evangelos and Kurt, Rafet Emek (2018) Comparative review of collision avoidance systems in maritime and aviation. In: The 3rd International Symposium On Naval Architecture And Maritime (INT-NAM 2018). Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul. (In Press)

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Abstract

This study provides a comparison between aviation and maritime industries in the context of collision avoidance. Thus, it focuses on the regulations, operational practices, techniques and procedures in both aeroplanes and ships for collision avoidance. Due to safety and technology advancements in the aviation industry, advancements in aviation to prevent collision avoidance can be implemented in ships, developing a better situational awareness and improved navigational watch. Generally, the Officer of the Watch (OOW) on board ships is responsible for all the decisions that need to be taken on the navigational bridge. Consequently, this requires an immense amount of data analysis; moreover, this data is located in various locations on the bridge. Yet this can cause a work overload for the OOW, potentially leading to human errors and lack of situational awareness. This study reveals the shortages in maritime industry, helping us to adopt new safety-related enhancements and technologies to reduce the risk of collision at sea, which is inspired by the aviation industry.