Picture of virus

Open Access research that helps to deliver "better medicines"...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), a major research centre in Scotland and amongst the UK's top schools of pharmacy.

Research at SIPBS includes the "New medicines", "Better medicines" and "Better use of medicines" research groups. Together their research explores multidisciplinary approaches to improve understanding of fundamental bioscience and identify novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions, investigation of the development and manufacture of drug substances and products, and harnessing Scotland's rich health informatics datasets to inform stratified medicine approaches and investigate the impact of public health interventions.

Explore Open Access research by SIPBS. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Multi-wavelength emission from a single InGaN/GaN nanorod analyzed by cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging

Kusch, Gunnar and Conroy, Michele and Li, Haoning and Edwards, Paul R. and Zhao, Chao and Ooi, Boon S. and Pugh, Jon and Cryan, Martin J. and Parbrook, Peter J. and Martin, Robert W. (2018) Multi-wavelength emission from a single InGaN/GaN nanorod analyzed by cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging. Scientific Reports, 8 (1). ISSN 2045-2322

[img]
Preview
Text (Kusch-etal-SR-2018-single-InGaN-GaN-nanorod-analyzed-by-cathodoluminescence-hyperspectral-imaging)
Kusch_etal_SR_2018_single_InGaN_GaN_nanorod_analyzed_by_cathodoluminescence_hyperspectral_imaging.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Multiple luminescence peaks emitted by a single InGaN/GaN quantum-well(QW) nanorod, extending from the blue to the red, were analysed by a combination of electron microscope based imaging techniques. Utilizing the capability of cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging it was possible to investigate spatial variations in the luminescence properties on a nanoscale. The high optical quality of a single GaN nanorod was demonstrated, evidenced by a narrow band-edge peak and the absence of any luminescence associated with the yellow defect band. Additionally two spatially confined broad luminescence bands were observed, consisting of multiple peaks ranging from 395nm to 480nm and 490nm to 650 nm. The lower energy band originates from broad c-plane QWs located at the apex of the nanorod and the higher energy band from the semipolar QWs on the pyramidal nanorod tip. Comparing the experimentally observed peak positions with peak positions obtained from plane wave modelling and 3D finite difference time domain(FDTD) modelling shows modulation of the nanorod luminescence by cavity modes. By studying the influence of these modes we demonstrate that this can be exploited as an additional parameter in engineering the emission profile of LEDs.