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A systematic and integrated review of mobile-based technology to promote active lifestyles in people with Type 2 diabetes

McMillan, Kathryn Anne and Kirk, Alison and Hewitt, Allan and MacRury, Sandra (2016) A systematic and integrated review of mobile-based technology to promote active lifestyles in people with Type 2 diabetes. In: Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2016, 2016-03-02 - 2016-03-04, Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre.

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Abstract

Background: An active lifestyle is important for good Type 2 diabetes management. Mobile-based technology is increasingly being used to promote active lifestyles. Aim: To review studies examining the effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of mobile-based technology for promoting active lifestyles in people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: An integrated, systematic review method was used to allow inclusion of a variety of study designs. A comprehensive search of electronic databases including; PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect and ACM Digital Library was conducted to retrieve studies promoting active lifestyles in people with Type 2 diabetes using mobile-based technology (apps and wearable technology). Studies had to assess; effectiveness, acceptability or feasibility of mobile based technology. Studies were categorised as 1)informing, 2)monitoring, 3)provoking or 4)sustaining behaviour. Results: A total of 9 papers from the 7662 sourced met inclusion criteria; 5 studies used smartphone or tablet apps, 1 a diabetes personal digital assistant, 1 a combination of continuous glucose monitor and accelerometer, 1 a pedometer and 1 a website delivered by a smartphone. The effectiveness of technology was assessed in 6 studies, feasibility examined in 3 studies and acceptability in 4 studies. Most (n=5) of the studies examined the effectiveness of using mobile-based technology to provoke lifestyle. The effectiveness of mobile-based technology in monitoring active lifestyles and the feasibility and acceptability of using mobile-based technology to sustained lifestyle change has not been investigated. Conclusions: To maintain health benefit from active lifestyles future research should explore the feasibility and acceptability of mobile based technology monitoring in sustaining active lifestyles.