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Practical application of direct electron detectors to EBSD mapping in 2D and 3D

Mingard, K.P. and Stewart, M. and Gee, M.G. and Vespucci, S. and Trager-Cowan, C. (2018) Practical application of direct electron detectors to EBSD mapping in 2D and 3D. Ultramicroscopy, 184 (Part A). pp. 242-251. ISSN 0304-3991

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    Abstract

    The use of a direct electron detector for the simple acquisition of 2D electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps and 3D EBSD datasets with a static sample geometry has been demonstrated in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope. The small size and flexible connection of the Medipix direct electron detector enabled the mounting of sample and detector on the same stage at the short working distance required for the FIB. Comparison of 3D EBSD datasets acquired by this means and with conventional phosphor based EBSD detectors requiring sample movement showed that the former method with a static sample gave improved slice registration. However, for this sample detector configuration, significant heating by the detector caused sample drift. This drift and ion beam reheating both necessitated the use of fiducial marks to maintain stability during data acquisition.