Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Synthetic biological approaches for RNA labelling and imaging : design principles and future opportunities

Pauff, Steven and Withers, Jamie M and McKean, Iain JW and Mackay, Simon P and Burley, Glenn A (2017) Synthetic biological approaches for RNA labelling and imaging : design principles and future opportunities. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 48. pp. 153-158. ISSN 0958-1669

[img]
Preview
Text (Pauff-etal-COB-2017-Synthetic-biological-approaches-for-RNA-labelling-and-imaging-design-principles)
Pauff_etal_COB_2017_Synthetic_biological_approaches_for_RNA_labelling_and_imaging_design_principles.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript
License: Open Government Licence (OGL) 3.0

Download (903kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    RNA is the most mercurial of all biomacromolecules. In contrast to DNA, where the predominant role is the storage of genetic information, the biological role of RNA varies; ranging from a template-based intermediary in gene expression to playing a direct role in catalysis. Their high turnover and metabolic lability makes the detection of specific sequences particularly challenging. This review describes the latest synthetic biological developments that enable the direct imaging of RNA both in vitro and in their native cellular environment.