Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led ORIF ankle care programme

Martin, Maria Cristina and Akartunali, Kerem and Anderson, Gillian Hopkins (2016) Cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led ORIF ankle care programme. In: BCS Health Informatics Scotland 2016, 2016-10-11 - 2016-10-12, Strathclyde Technology Innovation Centre.

[img]
Preview
Text (Martin-etal-HIS-2016-Cost-effectiveness-of-a-nurse-led-ORIF-ankle-care)
Martin_etal_HIS_2016_Cost_effectiveness_of_a_nurse_led_ORIF_ankle_care.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Unspecified

Download (521kB) | Preview

Abstract

In response to current outdated models of outpatient fracture care, a nurse-led ankle care protocol was implemented by Glasgow Royal Infirmary’s (GRI) fracture clinic. Its aim was to standardise post- surgery care for Open Reduction Internal Fixation (ORIF) ankle fractures, while maintaining patient reported outcomes. The demand for evaluation across healthcare in the UK is exponentially increasing and although the protocol has been widely accepted throughout the clinic, no evidence existed to confirm its cost-effectiveness. This study fills that gap in knowledge through a thorough cost-evaluation using Discrete Event Simulation (DES), a widely recognised and powerful modelling tool within healthcare evaluation. It was found that the difference between the total number of appointments attended patients between the two groups was not significant (p>0.05). However, results of the cost-modelling clearly show that a 28.12% saving can be achieved when comparing total staffing costs and X-ray costs between the two groups.