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Assessment of boundary-element method for modelling a free-floating sloped wave energy device. Part 2 : experimental validation

Payne, Grégory S. and Taylor, Jamie R M and Bruce, Tom and Parkin, Penny (2008) Assessment of boundary-element method for modelling a free-floating sloped wave energy device. Part 2 : experimental validation. Ocean Engineering, 35 (3-4). pp. 342-357. ISSN 0029-8018

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Abstract

The boundary-element method has been widely used as a design tool in the offshore and ship building industry for more than 30 years. Its application to wave energy conversion is, however, more recent. This is the second of two papers on a comparison of numerical and physical modelling of a free-floating sloped wave energy converter. In the first paper the numerical modelling formulation for the power take-off mechanism was derived using the boundary-element method package WAMIT. It was verified against numerical benchmark data. In this paper, the outcome of the modelling of the whole device is compared with experimental measurements obtained from model testing in a wave tank. The agreement is generally good.