Picture child's feet next to pens, pencils and paper

Open Access research that is helping to improve educational outcomes for children

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Education, including those researching educational and social practices in curricular subjects. Research in this area seeks to understand the complex influences that increase curricula capacity and engagement by studying how curriculum practices relate to cultural, intellectual and social practices in and out of schools and nurseries.

Research at the School of Education also spans a number of other areas, including inclusive pedagogy, philosophy of education, health and wellbeing within health-related aspects of education (e.g. physical education and sport pedagogy, autism and technology, counselling education, and pedagogies for mental and emotional health), languages education, and other areas.

Explore Open Access education research. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

DC protection of a muti-terminal HVDC network featuring offshore wind farms

Parker, Max and Finney, Stephen and Holliday, Derrick (2017) DC protection of a muti-terminal HVDC network featuring offshore wind farms. Energy Procedia. ISSN 1876-6102 (In Press)

[img]
Preview
Text (Parker-Finney-Holliday-EP-2017-DC-protection-of-a-multi-terminal-HVDC-network)
Parker_Finney_Holliday_EP_2017_DC_protection_of_a_multi_terminal_HVDC_network.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 logo

Download (821kB) | Preview

Abstract

A protection scheme for DC faults has been designed for a multi-terminal HVDC network used to transfer energy from three large offshore wind farms to shore. The system uses open access models created in the EU-funded BEST-PATHS project, including a manufacturer-supplied wind farm model. Tripping conditions for the DC circuit breakers are found through simulation, along with current limiting inductor sizes, based on the use of a hybrid circuit breaker. Simulations of faults in the HVDC network show the ability of the protection scheme to isolate the fault, and the converter stations and wind turbines are able to ride-through the fault without tripping based on the 5ms switching time of the circuit breakers Longer switching times will cause significant rises in the offshore grid frequency, which could cause the turbines to trip.