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Bioanalytical measurements enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes

Jamieson, Lauren E. and Asiala, Steven M. and Gracie, Kirsten and Faulds, Karen and Graham, Duncan (2017) Bioanalytical measurements enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes. Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry, 10. ISSN 1936-1335

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Abstract

Since its discovery in 1974, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has gained momentum as an important tool in analytical chemistry. SERS is used widely for analysis of biological samples, ranging from in vitro cell culture models, ex vivo tissue and blood samples, and direct in vivo application. New insights have been gained into biochemistry, with an emphasis on biomolecule detection, from small molecules such as glucose and amino acids to larger biomolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. These measurements have increased our understanding of biological systems, and significantly, they have improved diagnostic capabilities. SERS probes display unique advantages in their detection sensitivity and multiplexing capability. We highlight key considerations that are required when performing bioanalytical SERS measurements, including sample preparation, probe selection, instrumental configuration, and data analysis. Some of the key bioanalytical measurements enabled by SERS probes with application to in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo biological environments are discussed.