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Health, employment and relationships : correlates of personal wellbeing in young adults with and without a history of childhood language impairment

Conti-Ramsden, Gina and Durkin, Kevin and Mok, Pearl L. H. and Toseeb, Umar and Botting, Nicola (2016) Health, employment and relationships : correlates of personal wellbeing in young adults with and without a history of childhood language impairment. Social Science and Medicine, 160. pp. 20-28. ISSN 0277-9536

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Abstract

Objective: We examine the potential associations between self-rated health, employment situation, relationship status and personal wellbeing in young adults with and without a history of language impairment (LI). Methods: In total, 172 24-year-olds from the UK participated, with approximately half (N = 84) having a history of LI. Personal wellbeing was measured using ratings from three questions from the Office for National Statistics regarding life satisfaction, happiness and life being worthwhile. Results: There were similarities between individuals with a history of LI and their age-matched peers in self-rated personal wellbeing. However, regression analyses revealed self-rated health was the most consistent predictor of personal wellbeing for individuals with a history of LI in relation to life satisfaction (21% of variance), happiness (11%) and perceptions that things one does in life are worthwhile (32%). None of the regression analyses were significant for their peers. Conclusions: Similarities on ratings of wellbeing by young adults with and without a history of LI can mask heterogeneity and important differences. Young adults with a history of LI are more vulnerable to the effects of health, employment and relationship status on their wellbeing than their peers.