Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

A novel methodology to study polymodal particle size distributions produced during continuous wet granulation

Mendez Torrecillas, Carlota and Halbert, Gavin W. and Lamprou, Dimitrios A. (2017) A novel methodology to study polymodal particle size distributions produced during continuous wet granulation. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 519 (1-2). pp. 230-239. ISSN 0378-5173

[img]
Preview
Text (Mendez-Torrecillas-etal-IJP2017-Polymodal-particle-size-distributions-produced-during-continuous-wet-granulation)
Mendez_Torrecillas_etal_IJP2017_Polymodal_particle_size_distributions_produced_during_continuous_wet_granulation.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 logo

Download (2MB)| Preview

    Abstract

    It is important during powder granulation to obtain particles of a homogeneous size especially in critical situations such as pharmaceutical manufacture. To date, homogeneity of particle size distribution has been defined by the use of the d50 combined with the span of the particle size distribution, which has been found ineffective for polymodal particle size distributions. This work focuses on demonstrating the limitations of the span parameter to quantify homogeneity and proposes a novel improved metric based on the transformation of a typical particle size distribution curve into a homogeneity factor which can vary from 0 to 100%. The potential of this method as a characterisation tool has been demonstrated through its application to the production of granules using two different materials. The workspace of an 11 mm twin screw granulator was defined for two common excipients (α-lactose monohydrate and microcrystalline cellulose). Homogeneity of the obtained granules varied dramatically from 0 to 95 % in the same workspace, allowing identification of critical process parameters (e.g. feed rate, liquid/solid ratio, torque velocities). In addition it defined the operational conditions required to produce the most homogeneous product within the range 5 μm – 2.2 mm from both materials.