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Biocatalytic self-assembly using reversible and irreversible enzyme immobilization

Conte, M. P. and Lau, K. H. A. and Ulijn, R. V. (2017) Biocatalytic self-assembly using reversible and irreversible enzyme immobilization. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 9 (4). pp. 3266-3271. ISSN 1944-8244

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Abstract

Biocatalytic control of molecular self-assembly provides an effective approach for developing smart biomaterials, allowing versatile enzyme-mediated tuning of material structure and properties as well as biomedical applications. We functionalized surfaces with bioinspired polydopamine and polyphenol coatings to study the effects of enzyme surface localization and surface release on the self-assembly process. We show how these coatings could be conveniently used to release enzymes for bulk gelation as well as to irreversibly immobilize enzymes for localizing the self-assembly to the surface. The results provide insights to the mode of action of biocatalytic self-assembly relevant to nanofabrication and enzyme-responsive materials.