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On cost-effective reuse of components in the design of complex reconfigurable systems

Aizpurua, J.I. and Papadopoulos, Y. and Muxika, E. and Chiacchio, F. and Manno, G. (2017) On cost-effective reuse of components in the design of complex reconfigurable systems. Quality and Reliability Engineering International. ISSN 0748-8017

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Abstract

Design strategies that benefit from the reuse of system components can reduce costs whilst maintaining or increasing dependability—we use the term dependability to tie together reliability and availability. D3H2 (aDaptive Dependable Design for systems with Homogeneous and Heterogeneous redundancies) is a methodology that supports the design of complex systems with a focus on reconfiguration and component reuse. D3H2 systematises the identification of heterogeneous redundancies and optimises the design of fault detection and reconfiguration mechanisms, by enabling the analysis of design alternatives with respect to dependability and cost. In this paper, we extend D3H2 for application to repairable systems. The method is extended with analysis capabilities allowing dependability assessment of complex reconfigurable systems. Analysed scenarios include time-dependencies between failure events and the corresponding reconfiguration actions. We demonstrate how D3H2 can support decisions about fault detection and reconfiguration that seek to improve dependability whilst reducing costs via application to a realistic railway case study.