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A simplified creep-reverse plasticity solution method for bodies subjected to cyclic loading

Chen, Haofeng and Ponter, Alan R.S. (2004) A simplified creep-reverse plasticity solution method for bodies subjected to cyclic loading. European Journal of Mechanics - A/Solids, 23 (4). pp. 561-577. ISSN 0997-7538

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Abstract

An extension of the upper bound shakedown theorem to load histories in excess of shakedown has been applied recently to the evaluation of a ratchet limit and the varying plastic strain magnitudes associated with a varying residual stress field. Solutions were obtained by the Linear Matching Method. In the present paper, this technique is extended to the evaluation of creep-reverse plasticity mechanism for bodies subjected to thermal cyclic loading including creep effects. The accumulated creep strain, the varying flow stress and the corresponding varying residual stress field during a creep dwell time are evaluated as well as the elastic follow-up factor. Three alternative computational strategies are discussed with differing but related assumptions. The problem of a plate with a central circular hole is discussed, subjected to cyclic thermal load. All three methods provide similar values for the elastic follow-up factor, indicating that the result is insensitive to the range of assumptions made. The simplest method, Method 1, is suggested as the basis of a general purpose method for use in life assessment.