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Measuring the daily activity of lying down, sitting, standing and stepping of obese children using the activPALTM activity monitor

Wafa, Sharifah Wajihah and Aziz, Nur Nadzirah and Shahril, Mohd Razif and Halib, Hasmiza and Rahim, Marhasiyah and Janssen, Xanne (2016) Measuring the daily activity of lying down, sitting, standing and stepping of obese children using the activPALTM activity monitor. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. pp. 1-6. ISSN 0142-6338

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Abstract

This study describes the patterns of objectively measured sitting, standing and stepping in obese children using the activPALTM and highlights possible differences in sedentary levels and patterns during weekdays and weekends. Sixty-five obese children, aged 9-11 years, were recruited from primary schools in Terengganu, Malaysia. Sitting, standing and stepping were objectively measured using an activPALTM accelerometer over a period of 4-7 days. Obese children spent an average of 69.6% of their day sitting/lying, 19.1% standing and 11.3% stepping. Weekdays and weekends differed significantly in total time spent sitting/lying, standing, stepping, step count, number of sedentary bouts and length of sedentary bouts (p < 0.05, respectively). Obese children spent a large proportion of their time sedentarily, and they spent more time sedentarily during weekends compared with weekdays. This study on sedentary behaviour patterns presents valuable information for designing and implementing strategies to decrease sedentary time among obese children, particularly during weekends.