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Accelerating renewable connections through coupling demand and distributed generation

Plecas, Milana and Gill, Simon and Kockar, Ivana (2016) Accelerating renewable connections through coupling demand and distributed generation. In: 2016 IEEE Electrical Power and Energy Conference (EPEC). IEEE, [Piscataway, N.J]. ISBN 978-1-5090-1919-9

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Abstract

The objective of this paper is to investigate the options for using local demand to accelerate the connection of renewable Distributed Generation (DG) capacity. It presents a range of architectures for operating Distributed Energy Systems (DESs) that contain local demand and distributed generation. The concept of a DES is that demand is supplied by local DG either using privately owned distribution assets or a public distribution network owned by a Distribution Network Operator (DNO). Operation of a DES can help manage variability in DG output, reduce curtailment in Active Network Management (ANM) schemes, and assist the DNO in managing network constraints. They also provide a move towards local trading of electricity with potential financial and non-financial benefits to both distributed generators and local demand customers.