Picture map of Europe with pins indicating European capital cities

Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

Bio-inspired sound localization sensor with high directional sensitivity

Reid, Andrew and Windmill, James F.C. and Uttamchandani, Deepak (2015) Bio-inspired sound localization sensor with high directional sensitivity. Procedia Engineering, 120. pp. 289-293. ISSN 1877-7058

[img]
Preview
Text (Reid-etal-Eurosensors-2015-Bio-inspired-sound-localization-sensor-with-high)
Reid_etal_Eurosensors_2015_Bio_inspired_sound_localization_sensor_with_high.pdf - Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 logo

Download (629kB) | Preview

Abstract

MEMS microphones inspired by Ormia ochracea are constrained by their reliance on the resonant behavior of the system, forcing designers to compromise the goal of high amplification of directional cues to operate across the audio range. Here we present an alternative approach, namely a system optimized for the maximum amplification of directional cues across a narrow bandwidth operating purely as a sound-localization sensor for wide-band noise. Directional sensitivity is enhanced by increasing the coupling strength beyond the 'dual optimization' point, which represents the collocation of a local maximum in directional sensitivity and a local minimum in non-linearity, compensating for the loss of the desirable linearity of the system by restricting the angular range of operation. Intensity gain achieved is 16.3 dB at 10° sound source azimuth with a linear directional sensitivity of 1.6 dB per degree, while linear directional sensitivity in phase difference gain shows a seven fold increase over the 'dual optimization' point of 8 degrees phase difference per degree change in azimuthal angle.