The effect of the More Active MuMs in Stirling trial on body composition and psychological well-being among postnatal women

Lee, Alyssa S and McInnes, Rhona J and Hughes, Adrienne R and Guthrie, Wendy and Jepson, Ruth (2016) The effect of the More Active MuMs in Stirling trial on body composition and psychological well-being among postnatal women. Journal of Pregnancy, 2016. ISSN 2090-2735

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    Abstract

    Introduction. Physical activity is important for health and well-being; however, rates of postnatal physical activity can be low.This paper reports the secondary outcomes of a trial aimed at increasing physical activity among postnatal women. Methods. More ActiveMuMs in Stirling (MAMMiS) was a randomised controlled trial testing the effect of physical activity consultation and pram walking group intervention among inactive postnatal women. Data were collected on postnatal weight, body composition, general well-being, and fatigue. Participants were also interviewed regarding motivations and perceived benefits of participating in the trial. Results. There was no significant effect of the intervention on any weight/body composition outcome or on general well-being at three or six months of follow-up. There was a significant but inconsistent difference in fatigue between groups. Qualitative data highlighted a number of perceived benefits to weight, body composition, and particularly well-being (including improved fatigue) which were not borne out by objective data. Discussion. The MAMMiS study found no impact of the physical activity intervention on body composition and psychological well-being and indicates that further research is required to identify successful approaches to increase physical activity and improve health and well-being among postnatal women.