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A novel method for the provision of flight experience and flight testing for undergraduate aeronautical engineers at the University of Strathclyde

Scanlon, T.J. and Stickland, M.T. (2004) A novel method for the provision of flight experience and flight testing for undergraduate aeronautical engineers at the University of Strathclyde. Aeronautical Journal, 108 (1084). pp. 315-318. ISSN 0001-9240

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Abstract

The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Strathclyde has developed a novel flight experience/test course for undergraduate Aeronautical Engineers. In common with similar courses at undergraduate level the course contains practical instruction in how an aircraft is flown, an analysis of its stall characteristics and an assessment of an aircraft's performance and stability. However, uniquely, the Strathclyde course consists of dual instructional flights in two seat gliders. This paper contains a detailed description of the flight experience/test course developed at Strathclyde and its incorporation into the undergraduate curriculum. A critical analysis of its delivery is also presented.