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Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

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Global Iron. From Possil to Rothesay and Calcutta via Wemyss Bay

Charley, J.H. (2005) Global Iron. From Possil to Rothesay and Calcutta via Wemyss Bay. [Show/Exhibition]

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Abstract

Taking as its starting point Scotland's 6,000-mile coastline, the exhibition explores the way that the sea has impacted on the social, cultural and industrial development of the nation from earliest times, and speculates upon how man's relationship with the edge of the nation might develop. Five architect and design practices were asked to address the topic by interrogating particular sites within the broad context of historic influences and, more narrowly, in relation to a specific theme. Models of their proposed "coastal machines" - metaphorical devices capable of encapsulating the changing social and environmental processes that might impact upon our coastal regions over the next half century - will form the centrepiece of the exhibition.