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Microfluidic converging-diverging channels optimised for performing extensional measurements

Zografos, Konstantinos and Alves, M.A. and Oliveira, Monica (2015) Microfluidic converging-diverging channels optimised for performing extensional measurements. In: 6th International Symposium on Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics 2015, 2015-07-15 - 2015-07-17, ESPCI.

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Abstract

Microfluidics refers to the science and technology that deals with devices which manipulate and examine fluid flows in small scaled systems (1μm - 1000μm). The possibility of such microfabricated channels to replicate the natural environment at the dimensional scale of many biological and industrial processes, together with the small amount of volume sample they require, increased rapidly their popularity in many fields (i.e. biotechnology, engineering etc.). Additionally, microfluidics offers the ability to produce fluid flows that are characterised by high deformation rates under small Reynolds numbers (Re), offering a promising platform for investigating fluids described by complex rheological behaviour. That way, important viscoelastic effects.