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Heterogeneous integration of gallium nitride light-emitting diodes on diamond and silica by transfer printing

Trindade, A. J. and Guilhabert, B. and Xie, E. Y. and Ferreira, R. and McKendry, J. J. D. and Zhu, D. and Laurand, N. and Gu, E. and Wallis, D. J. and Watson, I. M. and Humphreys, C. J. and Dawson, M. D. (2015) Heterogeneous integration of gallium nitride light-emitting diodes on diamond and silica by transfer printing. Optics Express, 23 (7). pp. 9329-9338. ISSN 1094-4087

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Abstract

We report the transfer printing of blue-emitting micron-scale light-emitting diodes (micro-LEDs) onto fused silica and diamond substrates without the use of intermediary adhesion layers. A consistent Van der Waals bond was achieved via liquid capillary action, despite curvature of the LED membranes following release from their native silicon growth substrates. The excellence of diamond as a heat-spreader allowed the printed membrane LEDs to achieve optical power output density of 10 W/cm2 when operated at a current density of 254 A/cm2. This high-currentdensity operation enabled optical data transmission from the LEDs at 400 Mbit/s.