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Synthesis of porous microspheres via self-assembly of monodisperse polymer nanospheres

Mouaziz, H. and Lacki, K. and Larsson, A. and Sherrington, D.C. (2004) Synthesis of porous microspheres via self-assembly of monodisperse polymer nanospheres. Journal of Materials Chemistry, 14 (15). pp. 2421-2424. ISSN 0959-9428

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Abstract

Conventional synthesis of porous spherical particulate polymer resins via suspension polymerisation involves a complex combination of processes (polymerisation, crosslinking, phase separation and microgel formation, microgel fusion and pore in-filling). We have now succeeded in producing porous polymer microspheres via the self-assembly of pre-formed monodisperse poly(styrene-co-methacrylic acid) latex particles (ca. 200 nm). The self-assembly is performed in suspension in toluene and is driven by the removal of water at ca. 105degreesC. This thermal process also induces contact fusion of the latex particles.