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Intervention urbanism : the delicacy of aspirational change in the old center of Doha

Salama, Ashraf M (2014) Intervention urbanism : the delicacy of aspirational change in the old center of Doha. Urban Pamphleteer, 4. pp. 1-3.

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Abstract

The city of Doha keeps repositioning itself on the map of international architecture and urbanism. But, while the rapid urban growth of the city continues to be a subject of debate, little attention has been paid to the nature of change and intervention in the old city core. I interrogate these processes in the light of three questions: Can an urban intervention be simultaneously local and global? Can it demonstrate international best practices without ignoring traditional knowledge? Would a prioritisation of local influences or an interest in heritage conservation represent narrow-mindedness?