Picture of sea vessel plough through rough maritime conditions

Innovations in marine technology, pioneered through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research here explores the potential of marine renewables, such as offshore wind, current and wave energy devices to promote the delivery of diverse energy sources. Expertise in offshore hydrodynamics in offshore structures also informs innovations within the oil and gas industries. But as a world-leading centre of marine technology, the Department is recognised as the leading authority in all areas related to maritime safety, such as resilience engineering, collision avoidance and risk-based ship design. Techniques to support sustainability vessel life cycle management is a key research focus.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

The impact of the spatial qualities of the workplace on architects' job satisfaction

Salama, Ashraf M. and Courtney, Leanne (2013) The impact of the spatial qualities of the workplace on architects' job satisfaction. ArchNet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, 7 (1). pp. 52-64. ISSN 1938-7806

[img]
Preview
Text (Salama-Courtney-ArchNet-2013-impact-of-the-spatial-qualities-of-the-workplace-on-architects-job-satisfaction)
Salama_Courtney_ArchNet_2013_impact_of_the_spatial_qualities_of_the_workplace_on_architects_job_satisfaction.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 logo

Download (463kB) | Preview

Abstract

Undoubtedly Job satisfaction among architects is necessary to create a healthy work environment and in turn supports the creation of meaningful built environments. This paper examines the phenomenon of job satisfaction amongst architects and the factors that significantly influence it in the context of Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK. A descriptive survey in the form of a questionnaire and structured interviews was utilized to form a comprehensive methodology for investigation, which was conducted in 2009. In total, three hundred questionnaires were administered, addressing architects working in both private and public sectors, while twelve interviews were conducted, with six for each sector. Preliminary findings indicate that job satisfaction has been rated to be relatively high amongst Belfast architects. Factors identified as particularly significant include control over thermal conditions, acoustics, views, lighting, and ergonomics