Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Isolation and characterization of highly polymorphic microsatellite loci in the 2-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata

Haddrill, P. R. and Majerus, M. E N and Mayes, S. (2002) Isolation and characterization of highly polymorphic microsatellite loci in the 2-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata. Molecular Ecology Notes, 2 (3). pp. 316-319. ISSN 1471-8278

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Contrary to theoretical predictions, female 2-spot ladybirds (Adalia bipunctata) mate many more times than necessary to maintain high fertilisation success and may gain through the acquisition of material or genetic benefits. In order to investigate this mating system in detail, microsatellite markers have been isolated using a modified enrichment technique. Thirty-nine loci were successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), of which only two were monomorphic. Detailed characterization of ten loci revealed very high levels of polymorphism. These markers are likely to be invaluable tools with which to study population genetics and patterns of paternity in this species.