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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Inactivation of mycobacterium paratuberculosis by pulsed electric fields

Rowan, N.J. and MacGregor, S.J. and Anderson, J.G. and Cameron, Douglas and Farish, O. (2001) Inactivation of mycobacterium paratuberculosis by pulsed electric fields. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 67 (6). pp. 2833-2836. ISSN 0099-2240

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Abstract

The influence of treatment temperature and pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the viability of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis cells suspended in 0.1% (wt/vol) peptone water and in sterilized cow's milk was assessed by direct viable counts and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PEF treatment at 50°C (2,500 pulses at 30 kV/cm) reduced the level of viable M. paratuberculosis cells by approximately 5.3 and 5.9 log10 CFU/ml in 0.1% peptone water and in cow's milk, respectively, while PEF treatment of M. paratuberculosis at lower temperatures resulted in less lethality. Heating alone at 50°C for 25 min or at 72°C for 25 s (extended high-temperature, short-time pasteurization) resulted in reductions of M. paratuberculosis of approximately 0.01 and 2.4 log10 CFU/ml, respectively. TEM studies revealed that exposure to PEF treatment resulted in substantial damage at the cellular level to M. paratuberculosis.