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Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research here explores the potential of marine renewables, such as offshore wind, current and wave energy devices to promote the delivery of diverse energy sources. Expertise in offshore hydrodynamics in offshore structures also informs innovations within the oil and gas industries. But as a world-leading centre of marine technology, the Department is recognised as the leading authority in all areas related to maritime safety, such as resilience engineering, collision avoidance and risk-based ship design. Techniques to support sustainability vessel life cycle management is a key research focus.

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Establishing the optimum vessel maintenance approach based on system reliability and criticality analysis

Lazakis, Iraklis and Turan, Osman and Judah, Sol (2012) Establishing the optimum vessel maintenance approach based on system reliability and criticality analysis. In: Managing Reliability & Maintainability in the Maritime Industry. Royal Institution of Naval Architects.

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Abstract

Maritime maintenance is a key feature of the operational profile of a ship throughout its life cycle. In this paper, the application of the optimum maintenance approach onboard a Diving Support Vessel (DSV) is investigated through the introduction of the innovative Reliability and Criticality Based Maintenance (RCBM). At first, the study of the reliability and criticality analysis of the main systems of the vessel is performed. These include the Propulsion, Lifting, Anchoring & Hauling and Diving systems. Moreover, by using the Dynamic Fault Tree Analysis (DFTA) tool and the Birnbaum (Bir), Criticality (Cri) and Fussell-Vesely (F-V) reliability importance measures, the validation of the abovementioned results occurs. Remedial measures regarding the specific critical items/components identified are also suggested and introduced in terms of dynamic ‘SPARE’ gates in the DFT structure for each main system examined. Based on the results obtained with this approach, further suggestions and discussion for each one of the subject systems takes place.