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Study on properties of composites reinforced by heat treated glass fibres simulating thermal recycling conditions

Nagel, Ulf and Kao, Chih-Chuan and Thomason, James (2013) Study on properties of composites reinforced by heat treated glass fibres simulating thermal recycling conditions. In: 19th International Conference on Composite Materials, 2013-07-28 - 2013-08-02.

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Abstract

In the present study, commercial chopped glass fibres were heat treated at 300°C, 450°C, 500°C and 600°C to imitate a composite thermal recycling process. The heat treated fibres were extrusion compounded and injection moulded with polypropylene to form composites. The heat treatment increased the susceptibility of the fibres to length degradation during the melt processing particularly at higher conditioning temperatures. Comparison with the Cox model revealed that the stiffness of the composite was affected by the reduced fibre length. The reduced fibre length did not significantly contribute to the reduction of the tensile strength and the impact strength. These properties were deteriorated by other factors such as the strength degradation of the glass fibres and the reduced fibre matrix interaction. Thus a post treatment which recovers the fibre strength and optimizes the fibre-matrix interface will be essential to produce thermally recycled glass fibre composites with high mechanical properties.