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Regional employment impacts of marine energy in the Scottish economy : a general equilibrium approach

Gilmartin, Michelle and Allan, Grant (2015) Regional employment impacts of marine energy in the Scottish economy : a general equilibrium approach. Regional Studies, 49 (2). pp. 337-355. ISSN 0034-3404

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    Abstract

    Regional employment impacts of marine energy in the Scottish economy: a general equilibrium approach, Regional Studies. One aspect of the case for policy support for renewable energy developments is the wider economic benefits that are expected to be generated. Within Scotland, as with other regions of the UK, there is a focus on encouraging domestically based renewable technologies. This paper uses a regional computable general equilibrium framework to model the impact on the Scottish economy of expenditures relating to marine energy installations. The results illustrate the potential for (considerable) ‘legacy’ effects after expenditures cease. In identifying the specific sectoral expenditures with the largest impact on (lifetime) regional employment, this approach offers important policy guidance.