Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Effect of combination therapy on immunological progression of Human Immunodeficiency virus at a population level

Parpia, T. and Raab, G.M. and Goldberg, D.J. and Allardice, G.M. and McMenamin, J. and Whitelaw, J. and McSharry, C. and Potts, R. and Herriot, R. (2001) Effect of combination therapy on immunological progression of Human Immunodeficiency virus at a population level. American Journal of Epidemiology, 153 (9). pp. 898-902. ISSN 0002-9262

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

There is accumulating evidence from clinical trials and cohort studies that highly active antiretroviral combination therapy is effective at halting immunologic and clinical progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Its impact at a population level is less well known because the regimes may be difficult to tolerate and compliance poorer. The authors make use of population data for almost all of the HIV-infected people in Scotland in 1997 who were under clinical care and monitor their response to therapy during the first year when these effective treatments became widely available. More than two thirds of the HIV-positive patients were on some form of antiretroviral therapy during the year. The authors show that all treated groups, even those who were on changing regimes, showed net improvement in immunologic status during the year. For the group of patients on triple or quadruple therapy, there was an average increase of more than 100 CD4 cells/mm3 over the year, with other treatment groups showing more modest, but significant, increases.