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Furthering export participation in less performing developing countries: the effects of entrepreneurial orientation and managerial capacity factors

Ibeh, K.I.N. (2004) Furthering export participation in less performing developing countries: the effects of entrepreneurial orientation and managerial capacity factors. International Journal of Social Economics, 31 (1). pp. 94-110.

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Abstract

This paper reports relevant evidence regarding the importance of decision makers' background and experiential factors in promoting export entrepreneurship among less performing developing country firms. Subsequent discussion reveals the consistency of the findings with the balance of previous empirical literature, and underlines the need for international success-seeking LPDC firms to prioritise the acquisition of requisitely qualified managerial staff. The central thesis of the paper is that with the right quality of decision makers, smaller LPDC firms could be properly led to procure and develop other advantage-creating competencies that might enable them overcome external internationalisation barriers. The implications of the foregoing for enhancing LPDC firms' access to global markets, as envisioned under the Millennium Development Declaration, are discussed.