Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Enzyme-responsive hydrogel particles for the controlled release of proteins : designing peptide actuators to match payload

Thornton, Paul D. and Mart, Robert J. and Webb, Simon J. and Ulijn, Rein V. (2008) Enzyme-responsive hydrogel particles for the controlled release of proteins : designing peptide actuators to match payload. Soft Matter, 4 (4). pp. 821-827. ISSN 1744-6848

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

We report on enzyme-responsive hydrogel particles for the controlled release of proteins. Amino-functionalised poly(ethylene glycol acrylamide) (PEGA) hydrogel particles were functionalised with peptide actuators that cause charge-induced swelling and payload release when triggered enzymatically. Peptide-based actuators were designed to match the specificity of the target enzyme, while also matching the charge properties of the to-be released protein payload, thereby uniquely allowing for tuneable release profiles. Fluorescently labelled albumin and avidin, proteins of similar size but opposite charge, were released at a rate that was governed by the peptide actuator linked to the polymer carrier, offering a highly controlled release mechanism. Release profiles were analysed using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy of the solution and two-photon fluorescence microscopy to analyse enzymatically triggered molecular events within hydrogel particles during the initial stages of release.