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Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

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SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

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Cold collisions in a high-gradient magneto-optical trap

Ueberholz, B and Kuhr, S and Frese, D and Gomer, V and Meschede, D (2002) Cold collisions in a high-gradient magneto-optical trap. Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, 35 (23). pp. 4899-4914. ISSN 0953-4075

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Abstract

We present a detailed analysis of the cold collision measurements performed in a high-gradient magneto-optical trap with a few trapped Cs atoms first presented in Ueberholz et al (J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 33 (2000) L135). The ability to observe individual loss events allows us to identify two-body collisions that lead to the escape of only one of the colliding atoms (up to 10% of all collisional losses). Possible origins of these events are discussed here. We also observed strong modifications of the total loss rate with variations in the repumping laser intensity. This is explained by a simple semiclassical model based on optical suppression of hyperfine-changing collisions between ground-state atoms.