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Characterisation of III-nitride materials by synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction reciprocal space mapping

Kachkanov, V. and Dobnya, Igor and O'Donnell, Kevin and Lorenz, Katharina and Pereira, Sergio Manuel De Sousa and Watson, Ian and Sadler, Thomas and Li, Haoning and Zubialevich, Vitaly and Parbrook, Peter (2013) Characterisation of III-nitride materials by synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction reciprocal space mapping. Physica Status Solidi C, 10 (3). pp. 481-485. ISSN 1610-1642

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Abstract

X-ray Reciprocal Space Mapping (RSM) is a powerful tool to explore the structure of semiconductor materials. However, conventional lab-based RSMs are usually measured in two dimensions (2D) ignoring the third dimension of diffraction-space volume. We report the use of a combination of X-ray microfocusing and state-of-the-art 2D area detectors to study the full volume of diffraction–space while probing III-nitride materials on the microscale.