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Investigating the thermal stability of 1-3 piezoelectric composite transducers by varying the thermal conductivity and glass transition temperature of the polymeric filler material

Parr, A.C.S. and O'Leary, R.L. and Hayward, G. and Smillie, G. and Benny, C.G. and Ewing, H.C. and MacKintosh, A.R. (2002) Investigating the thermal stability of 1-3 piezoelectric composite transducers by varying the thermal conductivity and glass transition temperature of the polymeric filler material. In: 2002 IEEE Ultrasonics symposium proceedings. Ultrasonics Symposium . IEEE, New York, pp. 1173-1176. ISBN 0780375823

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    Abstract

    The thermal behaviour of a number of 1-3 piezoelectric composite transducers is discussed. In particular, devices manufactured from a polymer filler with a relatively high glass to rubber transition temperature (T-g), and from polymer systems with increased thermal conductivity, are evaluated. The mechanical properties of the various filler materials were obtained via ultrasonic measurements, with the thermal properties extracted using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (dmta), differential scanning calorimetry (dsc) and laserflash studies. A range of ultrasonic transducers were then constructed and their thermal stability studied using a combination of impedance analysis and laser surface displacement measurement.